Low blood pressure and heart rate during pregnancy

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Can Low Blood Pressure Affect Pregnancy?

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Low Blood Pressure Pregnancy

Low blood pressure and heart rate during pregnancy

Low blood pressure during pregnancy could make the pregnancy difficult to enjoy. You know, pregnancy is considering as the most amazing joyful experience in a woman’s life.

Hypotension pregnancy

The cardiovascular system normally undergoes various changes during pregnancy; heart rate increases, the amount of blood increases in the body and numerous hormonal changes, which causes a blood pressure variation. Hypotension during pregnancy would mean that the blood pressure ranges are below 90/60, the normal blood pressure being approximately 120/80.

Your blood pressure always rises and fall throughout the day depending on what you are doing, and it is normal for your blood pressure to change more during pregnancy.

Causes of Low Blood Pressure during Pregnancy

Most women begin experiencing a drop in blood pressure early in the first trimester with the middle of the second trimester often has the blood pressure lowest.

  • Dehydration – even if you don’t feel thirsty make sure you are sipping water throughout the day.
  • Prolonged bed rest may be the cause.
  • Expansion of blood circulation during pregnancy lowering the blood pressure.
  • During pregnancy hormonal changes (progesterone) occurs that causes the blood vessels to dilate and lower blood pressure.
  • The uterus enlarges, puts pressure on the large blood vessels causing hypotension. It is usually experiencing while lying down known as supine hypotension.
  • Postural hypotension is causing by the pooling of blood in the legs, which restricts the flow of blood to the brain. It happens while rising from a sitting position or lying position.
  • Anemia and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) can also cause low blood pressure during pregnancy.
  • Other risk factors such as folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiency.

Your blood pressure starts to rise gradually from 24 weeks of pregnancy. Your blood pressure should back to pre-pregnancy levels a few weeks before the birth of your baby.

Low Blood Pressure Treatment during Pregnancy

You can avoid low blood pressure during pregnancy by healthily changing your lifestyle.

  • Have a healthy food to prevent anemia or hypoglycemia (low blood glucose).
  • Drink enough even plenty of water or other liquid such as fruit juices to avoid dehydration.
  • Rise slowly and carefully, while getting up from a sitting or lying position. Do not stay at a particular position (sitting or standing) for a long time.
  • Lying on the left side is advisable instead of lying on the back. Laying on the back causes the uterus to pressurize the blood vessels, which restricts the blood flow and causes to lower blood pressure.
  • Do mild, regular exercise such as walking to prevent the symptoms of low blood pressure by improving blood circulation.
  • Compression stockings- Wear supporting stocking provides tight-fitting to your legs and abdomen helps to increase your BP.
  • Avoiding standing for a long time, this helps to prevent low BP due to miscommunication between the brain and heart.
  • Sitting or lying down for a while after eating, because after eating your blood circulation diverted to the digestive system. Thus low circulation to another area thus activity prevent this natural behavior and leads to low blood pressure.
  • Avoiding strenuous exercises as your blood pressure tends to drop lower after workout session or after physical activity.

There is nothing really to worry about whether the symptoms are mild, just consider it a part of the package and prepare to welcome the little bundle (baby) of big joy!

Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Apr 7, 2012 , Translated by Kristina Knazko

Low blood pressure and heart rate during pregnancy

Low blood pressure and heart rate during pregnancy

Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Blood pressure is the pressure that flowing blood exerts on arterial walls. Low blood pressure, or hypotension, is repeated blood pressure readings below 110/65 mmHg. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters mercury or torr. The first numerical value indicates systolic blood pressure, meaning the blood pressure when the heart contracts. The number after the slash refers to the diastolic pressure, meaning the blood pressure when the heart relaxes and blood is able to flow into its chambers. Low blood pressure does not necessarily burden a patient. If, however, low blood pressure occurs suddenly, it can be linked to serious illnesses. Low blood pressure can occur in pregnancy as well, where it can be a serious condition.

Causes of Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Low blood pressure can be completely natural and occur in young, healthy individuals, primarily women. It can also appear in older individuals as a sign of another underlying disease. Low blood pressure can appear in pregnancy either at its beginning or towards the end. Low blood pressure at the beginning of pregnancy is caused by the new system of blood circulation, where blood is pumped to the placenta as well, nourishing the fetus. The circulatory system of a pregnant mother needs to adapt to the new circumstances and the new circulatory path. This can sometimes lead to lower blood pressure. Low blood pressure at the end of pregnancy usually appears in the supine position (lying down) due to the oppression of the inferior vena cava by the heavy uterus. This condition is often referred to as inferior vena cava syndrome. Compression of this large vein, which carries deoxygenated blood from the lower half of the body, decreases blood return to the heart and thus decreases blood pressure.

Manifestations of Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Especially at the beginning of her pregnancy, the mother may suffer from symptoms linked to low blood pressure. These include weakness, fatigue, headaches, dizziness, the appearance of flashing lights, even fainting. The pregnant woman is at risk of falls, which could damage both her body and the fetus. In the event that the placenta is damaged or detaches from the inner wall of the uterus, miscarriage of the fetus and bleeding for the mother can occur, putting her in a life-threatening situation. During inferior vena cava syndrome, the woman may feel weak, an increased heart rate, nausea, fainting and loss of consciousness.

Consequences of Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Low blood pressure in pregnancy is associated with feeling weak, followed by dizziness and loss of consciousness. This leads to falls, which can result in various serious injuries. After a fall, the fetus may be directly injured or the placenta may detach from the uterine wall, all resulting in fetal death.

Diagnosing Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

A diagnosis of low blood pressure in pregnancy is based on regular blood pressure measurements with the help of a sphygmomanometer. A medical history must be taken and emphasis must be made of the characteristics of the symptoms and whether loss of consciousness occurred. It is equally important to determine whether the mother is taking any medications. Blood pressure is taken at every visit to the gynecologist and physician. If the pregnant woman experiences the above mentioned symptoms, blood pressure should be carefully monitored. Low blood pressure in pregnancy is confirmed after repeated blood pressure measurements at rest, by wrapping the cuff of the sphygmomanometer around the upper arm.

Treatment of Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Treatment of low blood pressure in pregnancy is primarily conservative. In the case of low blood pressure at the beginning of pregnancy, compression bandages on the lower limbs, standing up slowly from a sitting or lying position and adequate fluid intake are recommended. Regular small meals are also appropriate. The consumption of coffee and salty foods is not suitable during pregnancy. Low blood pressure appearing at the end of pregnancy is treated by the mother lying on her left side and if possible, giving birth in this position. All conditions related to low blood pressure in pregnancy fix themselves after giving birth. Pharmacological treatment is not very appropriate during pregnancy as a number of medications penetrate the placenta and affect the fetus. However if medication is required, a consultation with a specialist is necessary in order to avoid negative influences of the medications on the fetus.

Preventing Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Prevention means trying to avoid the emergence of diseases or certain conditions. For the prevention of low blood pressure in pregnancy, adequate fluid intake and slow verticalization (standing up from a sitting or lying position) are recommended. In the case of prolonged standing, subtle shuffling of the legs is recommended in order to improve the return of blood to the right half of the heart. Alternating cold and hot water in the shower is also recommended.

High blood pressure during pregnancy

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KEY POINTS

High blood pressure can cause problems for you and your baby during pregnancy, including preeclampsia and premature birth.

High blood pressure usually doesn’t cause signs or symptoms. Go to all your prenatal care visits so your provider can check your blood pressure.

If you need medicine to keep your blood pressure under control, take it every day.

If you’re at high risk for preeclampsia, your provider may want you to take low-dose aspirin to help prevent it.

What is high blood pressure?

Blood pressure is the force of blood that pushes against the walls of your arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from your heart to other parts of the body. If the pressure in your arteries becomes too high, you have high blood pressure (also called hypertension). High blood pressure can put extra stress on your heart and kidneys. This can lead to heart, disease, kidney disease and stroke.

Some women have high blood pressure before they get pregnant. Others have high blood pressure for the first time during pregnancy. About 8 in 100 women (8 percent) have some kind of high blood pressure during pregnancy. If you have high blood pressure, talk to your health care provider. Managing your blood pressure can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby.

How do you know if you have high blood pressure?

Your blood pressure reading is given as two numbers: the top (first) number is the pressure when your heart contracts (gets tight) and the bottom (second) number is the pressure when your heart relaxes. A normal blood pressure is 119/79 or lower. High blood pressure happens when the top number is 140 or greater, or when the bottom number is 90 or greater. Your blood pressure can go up or down during the day.

At each prenatal care checkup, your provider checks your blood pressure. To do this, she wraps a cuff (band) around your upper arm. She pumps air into the cuff to measure the pressure in your arteries when the heart contracts and then relaxes. If you have a high reading, your provider can recheck it to find out for sure if you have high blood pressure.

What pregnancy complications can high blood pressure cause?

High blood pressure can cause problems for you and your baby during pregnancy, including:

  • Preeclampsia. This is when a pregnant woman has high blood pressure and signs that some of her organs, like her kidneys and liver, may not be working properly. Signs and symptoms of preeclampsia include having protein in the urine, changes in vision and severe headaches. Preeclampsia can be a serious medical condition. Even if you have mild preeclampsia, you need treatment to make sure it doesn’t get worse. Without treatment, preeclampsia can cause kidney, liver and brain damage. In rare cases, it can lead to life-threatening conditions called eclampsia and HELLP syndrome. Eclampsia causes seizures and can lead to coma. HELLP syndrome is when you have serious blood and liver problems.
  • Premature birth. This is birth that happens too early, before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Even with treatment, a pregnant woman with severe high blood pressure or preeclampsia may need to give birth early to avoid serious health problems for her and her baby.
  • Low birthweight. This is when a baby is born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces. High blood pressure can narrow blood vessels in the uterus (womb). Your baby may not get enough oxygen and nutrients, causing him to grow slowly.
  • Placental abruption. This is a serious condition in which the placenta separates from the wall of the uterus before birth. If this happens, your baby may not get enough oxygen and nutrients in the womb. You also may have serious bleeding from the vagina. The placenta grows in the uterus and supplies the baby with food and oxygen through the umbilical cord.

If you have high blood pressure during pregnancy, you’re also more likely have a cesarean birth (also called c-section). This is surgery in which your baby is born through a cut that your doctor makes in your belly and uterus.

What kinds of high blood pressure can affect pregnancy?

Two kinds of high blood pressure that can happen during pregnancy:

  • Chronic hypertension. This is high blood pressure that you have before you get pregnant or that develops before 20 weeks of pregnancy. It doesn’t go away once you give birth. About 1 in 4 women with chronic hypertension (25 percent) has preeclampsia during pregnancy. If you’re at high risk for preeclampsia, your provider may treat you with low-dose aspirin to prevent it.

How can you manage high blood during pregnancy?

Here’s what you can do:

  • Go to all your prenatal care checkups, even if you’re feeling fine.
  • If you need medicine to control your blood pressure, take it every day. Your provider can help you choose one that’s safe for you and your baby.
  • Eat healthy foods. Don’t eat foods that are high in salt, like soup and canned foods. They can raise your blood pressure.
  • Stay active. Being active for 30 minutes each day can help you manage your weight, reduce stress and prevent problems like preeclampsia.
  • Don’t smoke,drink alcohol or use street drugs or abuse prescription drugs.

What can you do about high blood pressure before pregnancy?

Here’s what you can do:

  • Get a preconception checkup. This is a medical checkup you get before pregnancy to take care of health conditions that may affect your pregnancy.
  • Use birth control until your blood pressure is under control. Birth control is methods you can use to keep from getting pregnant.
  • Get to a healthy weight. Talk to your provider about the weight that’s right for you.
  • Eat healthy foods.
  • Do something active every day.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking is dangerous for people with high blood pressure because it damages blood vessel walls.

Sources:

http://sesame-employment.ml/jcw/v76609.php

http://healthy-ojas.com/lowbp/hypotension-pregnancy.html

http://en.medixa.org/illnesses/low-blood-pressure-in-pregnancy

http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/high-blood-pressure-during-pregnancy.aspx

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